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Twice over the next few years Danny was set upon by other kids in the neighborhood. Once they stole his cell phone; he called home from a subway station, and when his father came to retrieve him, he found Danny so shaken up that he was in a huddle, his arms wrapped around himself. Another time, a group of boys tried to rob him, but he got away, called the cops, and drove around with them to track down his assailants. When he discovered how young they were, he declined to press charges, saying he worried that a conviction might harm their futures.

The Life and Death of Private Danny Chen, 1992-2011

Leveson inquiry should address media sexism, argue women’s groups

They are calling for mandatory training for journalists on the law over reporting violence against women, the scale of violence against women and “clear sanctions for journalists who break the law”.

They also call for greater responsibility from editors and a public debate on “the daily publishing of pornography” in the Sun and the Star and a strong, independent press complaints regulatory system to replace the Press Complaints Commission.

"At the moment the PCC offers us no justice," said Sarah Green of EVAW. "Women’s organisations have no confidence in it and have stopped using it. We need a revamped PCC which has teeth which women and women’s organisations can use. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity. If it is not taken it will be a huge waste."

Read the article in full here.

Dial-A-Poem

Poet Heather Christle is launching her new collection by offering readers the opportunity to give her a call and hear her read a poem.

The American author, whose poems have appeared in the New Yorker, has just published her second collection, The Trees The Trees, and rather than relying on the usual publicity tour, has decided instead to list her phone number on her website. At set times every day until 14 July she will read a poem to anyone who calls her.

"The book itself is full of references to phones and phone calls, and the speaker often seems to mistake the technology of the page for that of the telephone, imagining that the reader is right there in the moment," said Christle. "My father is a merchant mariner, and when my sister and I were small we would record messages to him on cassette tapes. I’d often ask questions and then pause for his response. There’s something so lovely and sad about the hope that another actual person is on the other end of any technology. So I thought it would be interesting to bring that dynamic forward, to read these poems (which frequently address a ‘you’) directly to another person, across the intimate distance a telephone creates."

So far she has received around 60 calls, from a multitude of different readers, from a couple from Toronto looking for a love poem to a class in western Massachusetts.

"I didn’t feel particularly anxious ahead of time. I trust poetry to make good things happen, and so far that’s been the case. When I was writing these poems I so often had this mysterious ‘you’ just in front of me, just behind the page. When people call it’s as if that imagined figure has suddenly come to life.”

(Source)

Mystery Sculptor Leaves Intricate Paper Creations Across EdinburghScenes inspired by author Ian Rankin’s Rebus series have been created  out of paper and left in various locations across the city.

Cut from the pages of a book, models were left at Edinburgh’s Filmhouse Cinema and the National Library of Scotland last week. The Filmhouse creation  is a model of a cinema,  with a tiny paper Rankin sitting in the audience drinking a bottle of  Deuchars and warriors on horseback leaping from the screen.
The National  Library, meanwhile, received a model of a coffin and a gramophone  sculpted from a copy of Rankin’s novel Exit Music. A note left with the  Filmhouse’s model read “For @filmhouse – a gift – In support of  Libraries, Books, Words, Ideas … & All things *magic*”, while a  quote from Francis Ford Coppola, “I think cinema, movies, and magic have  always been closely associated”, was cut and pasted onto the model.
[…]
Jenny Leask, the Filmhouse’s programme and marketing coordinator,  said the cinema’s model had been left in the box office. “We’ve no idea  who it was. It seems to be someone who supports arts and libraries in  particular. But I don’t really want to know who it is. They’ve gone to  so much effort to be anonymous and I want to respect that.”

Read the article in full here. High-res

Mystery Sculptor Leaves Intricate Paper Creations Across Edinburgh

Scenes inspired by author Ian Rankin’s Rebus series have been created out of paper and left in various locations across the city.

Cut from the pages of a book, models were left at Edinburgh’s Filmhouse Cinema and the National Library of Scotland last week. The Filmhouse creation is a model of a cinema, with a tiny paper Rankin sitting in the audience drinking a bottle of Deuchars and warriors on horseback leaping from the screen.

The National Library, meanwhile, received a model of a coffin and a gramophone sculpted from a copy of Rankin’s novel Exit Music. A note left with the Filmhouse’s model read “For @filmhouse – a gift – In support of Libraries, Books, Words, Ideas … & All things *magic*”, while a quote from Francis Ford Coppola, “I think cinema, movies, and magic have always been closely associated”, was cut and pasted onto the model.

[…]

Jenny Leask, the Filmhouse’s programme and marketing coordinator, said the cinema’s model had been left in the box office. “We’ve no idea who it was. It seems to be someone who supports arts and libraries in particular. But I don’t really want to know who it is. They’ve gone to so much effort to be anonymous and I want to respect that.”

Read the article in full here.



He falters when asked about the process of getting into character.  This  is possibly his least favourite question. He is vague about the   experience of playing one of six Bob Dylans in the Todd Haynes film I’m Not There,   but says it’s great when he’s turned on by the material: he loved   getting into Dylan’s poetic side (he plays the singer as Arthur Rimbaud)   and became completely immersed in Keats before playing the poet in Jane Campion’s Bright Star.   But how does he unlock a character? He must think about it just a   little bit? He looks scared. “I really don’t!” Is it about being good at   empathy? “I’m just curious about how other people look at things. I’m   definitely interested in how everyone carries around a universe. But   once I’ve finished a role I tend to let it go completely – I can’t   remember much about it.”

Read the profile of Ben Whishaw in full here. One of my favourite actors, and criminally under-rated.

He falters when asked about the process of getting into character. This is possibly his least favourite question. He is vague about the experience of playing one of six Bob Dylans in the Todd Haynes film I’m Not There, but says it’s great when he’s turned on by the material: he loved getting into Dylan’s poetic side (he plays the singer as Arthur Rimbaud) and became completely immersed in Keats before playing the poet in Jane Campion’s Bright Star. But how does he unlock a character? He must think about it just a little bit? He looks scared. “I really don’t!” Is it about being good at empathy? “I’m just curious about how other people look at things. I’m definitely interested in how everyone carries around a universe. But once I’ve finished a role I tend to let it go completely – I can’t remember much about it.”

Read the profile of Ben Whishaw in full here. One of my favourite actors, and criminally under-rated.

The plight of one Bosnian family at the hands of Ratko Mladic

"A couple of Serb soldiers put Mevludin on a bus with other men. After several hours of waiting, the bus took them to a field where he was lined up with hundreds of other men. The Bosnian Serb soldiers opened fire, bullets raking across the chests, arms, and legs of the men. Mevludin made himself fall into the pit, where his cousin’s bleeding body fell on top of him. At nightfall, unhurt, he crawled out from under the bloodied and lifeless corpses and began a seven-day escape to Tuzla. He was one of the few men to survive the massacre."

Read the rest here.