media

Showing 22 posts tagged media

The newsstands cover and the subscribers’ cover of the July issue of Elle UK, featuring David Beckham, who is the first man to cover the magazine alone.

I have no idea how I feel about this. I mean, is it kind of Nuts-y? (As in the female equivalent of?) All I know this is one hell of a marketing ploy. Bravo, Lorraine Candy, bravo.

How the Daily Mail conquered England

The Mails approach to the Internet was initially as wary as its politics. (Dacre still doesn’t have a computer in his office.) “A lot of people say that the Internet is the future for newspapers,” he declared in 1999. “Well, I say to that: bullshit.com.”

Until 2006, the Mails Web site was an embarrassment—five articles a day slapped onto a spare background, cut off by a paywall. “When the paper first took over, it wasn’t the world’s best website,” Martin Clarke, Mail Online’s editor, said recently. In April, 2006, the paper reconsidered the site. It would be free, with a stand-alone staff. 

[…]

The site evolved on the fly. “We just decided to go hell-for-leather for ratings,” someone who was involved in the launch told me. “Anything relating to climate change, American politics, Muslims—we just chased the numbers very ruthlessly.”
A truly fascinating look at what goes on behind the scenes at The Daily Mail, and how it became the world’s most popular online news source.
Hey guys, can you spot me skulking at the back in this picture? Any idea where I am?
THAT’S RIGHT, King’s Place, a.k.a. The Guardian's HQ. Sadly, I wasn't there on business - I went to its first ever Open Weekend, which is exactly what it sounds like. The Guardian opened its doors to its readers, holding workshops and events featuring speakers such as Grayson Perry, Ian McEwan and David Miliband.
It also opened up its editing process, with one of the available sessions entitled ‘Editing the Guardian’, again, exactly what it sounds like (such transparency! All in the name of ‘open journalism’).
Because I am very, very keen, I got up early and managed to get one of the limited slots for the session - which was actually three sessions, in the form of the thrice-daily editorial meetings, with the G1 Editor Emily Wilson, Picture Editor Fiona Shields, G2 Editor Malik Meer, and lots of others, including News and Foreign desk editors.
It was a brave and innovative thing to do, and I found it both hugely interesting and somewhat reassuring; their editing process, it turns out, is not so different from that I’ve experienced with my university paper - except they have much nicer offices. High-res

Hey guys, can you spot me skulking at the back in this picture? Any idea where I am?

THAT’S RIGHT, King’s Place, a.k.a. The Guardian's HQ. Sadly, I wasn't there on business - I went to its first ever Open Weekend, which is exactly what it sounds like. The Guardian opened its doors to its readers, holding workshops and events featuring speakers such as Grayson Perry, Ian McEwan and David Miliband.

It also opened up its editing process, with one of the available sessions entitled ‘Editing the Guardian’, again, exactly what it sounds like (such transparency! All in the name of ‘open journalism’).

Because I am very, very keen, I got up early and managed to get one of the limited slots for the session - which was actually three sessions, in the form of the thrice-daily editorial meetings, with the G1 Editor Emily Wilson, Picture Editor Fiona Shields, G2 Editor Malik Meer, and lots of others, including News and Foreign desk editors.

It was a brave and innovative thing to do, and I found it both hugely interesting and somewhat reassuring; their editing process, it turns out, is not so different from that I’ve experienced with my university paper - except they have much nicer offices.

The only real tools for expression these days are YouTube, which turns my stomach," he says. "They take your creative works – your film that you poured hours and hours of energy into – and they put ads on top of it. They make it as gross an experience to watch your film as possible. I’m sure it will contribute to Google’s bottom line; I’m not sure it will inspire any creators.

From this interview with David Karp, Tumblr’s founder and CEO